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Museum Experience
Students in the Museum Studies master’s degree program are required to gain at least 250 hours must be in an approved, professionally supervised internship. The internship forms a critical component of the student’s total program and gives the student valuable training in the field as well as a chance to work closely with professional museum staff on meaningful projects in order to prepare for careers as museum professionals.

The internship must be mutually beneficial to both the student and the participating institution and be focused on activities relevant to the student's interests. The primary goal is to offer high-quality educational and practical experience in which the student acquires in-depth understanding of museum operations and activities while making a substantial professional contribution to the institution. Students should discuss possible internships with their advisors and the Museum Studies Director. Students may apply for internships at local, regional, national, or international museums. Internships may be paid or unpaid.

Internship Requirements

1. Students must complete an internship with a minimum of 250 contact hours in an approved institution.

2. A student intern must enroll for 3 credit hours in MUSE 799.

3. Internships usually take place during the summer between the student’s first and second year in the Museum Studies Program. They may also take place during the school year. Students should make every effort to work at their internship at least half-time.

4. Documentation.
    a. Internship Approval Form. Prior to the internship, the student must submit a description of the duties and activities that the internship will entail, including the name of the museum professional who will serve as the on-site supervisor. The Museum Studies Director must approve and sign the form before the internship begins. Documentation that the student has been accepted by the host institution must be provided.

    b. Journal and Portfolio. The student must keep a personal daily journal that describes, and reflects on, the internship experience. There is no predefined format for the journal; it may be handwritten or kept electronically – the critical element is that it is kept regularly during the internship. The portfolio will contain materials associated with the internship experience, such as products for which the student was responsible, photographs of activities, institutional policies and procedures, and examples of materials produced by the institution.

    c. Evaluation. At the end of the internship, the student’s on-site supervisor will submit to the Museum Studies Director a confidential evaluation of the student’s performance. The student also completes and submits an evaluation of the internship experience.

    d. Report. Students are required to write a 5-10 page paper describing, evaluating, and critically analyzing their internship experience. The student will use the paper to discuss how the internship supported their professional development as well as how they feel that they contributed to the institution’s goals.

5. Internships receive a grade of “S” (Satisfactory) or “U” (Unsatisfactory). The Museum Studies Director will assign a final grade based on the student’s paper, journal, and portfolio, along with the on-site supervisor’s evaluation.

Museum Experience Packet (pdf)


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Find out what KU's Museum Studies Program and our alumni are up to:

September 2017 Newsletter
January 2017 Newsletter
 

 

Museum Events

German-American History Talk and Gallery Tour
Saturday, October 21 | 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Watkins Museum of History, 1047 Massachusetts St.
Prof. William Keel of KU speaks on local German-American history, then we move to the third floor for a special tour of our new exhibit Community and Culture: The Lawrence Turnverein, with Watkins curator Brittany Keegan and Dr. Lorie Vanchena of KU.

My Name is Sallie Performance
October 25-26 | 7 p.m.-8 p.m.
Spencer Museum of Art, Gallery 317, Sam & Connie Perkins Central Court
This experimental, immersive musical theater experience tells the story of the founding gift of art to the University of Kansas that became the Spencer Museum of Art. Created by Spencer Archivist Robert Hickerson and featuring the talents of artists and students from across the community. The performance is a free special preview event and part of the centennial celebration of our collection. Tickets are available through Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.com/e/my-name-is-sallie-tickets-37725266287.

Science of the Macabre
Thursday, October 26 | 7 p.m.-9 p.m.
KU Natural History Museum, 1345 Jayhawk Blvd. 
Join us for a spooky night in the KU Natural History Museum as we celebrate Halloween. From spiders and snakes to parasites, we will explore the science of the creepy things that go bump in the night. See museum specimens, explore blood under black light, and enjoy free refreshments and win prizes.

Stories from the Museum Archives: Sallie Casey Thayer Collects
Sunday, November 5 | 2 p.m.-3 p.m.
Spencer Museum of Art, Rm 305, Stephen H. Goddard Study Center 
Spencer Museum archivist Robert Hickerson and student assistant Rose Wolf open up the archives for an exploration of primary resources that document the collection that initiated an art museum at KU. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Civic Leader and Art Collector: Sallie Casey Thayer and an Art Museum for KU and the Museum’s centennial celebration of our collection.

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