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The course of study leading to the Certificate in Museum Studies comprises 15 credit hours at the graduate level.

Required Courses (6 credits)
MUSE 801 The Nature of Museums
MUSE 802 The Culture of Museums

Other Courses (6 credits)
Students must take one MUSE course that focuses on one of the Museum Professional Areas, and one course that focuses on one of the Museum Conceptual Domains.

Museum Experience (3 credits)
Students earning the Certificate in Museum Studies must complete an approved 3-credit-hour internship of at least 250 hours. See the guidelines for internships described for the Master’s Degree in Museum Studies.

 


Museum Professional Areas (3 credits)

Students earning a Graduate Certificate must complete at least one Museum Studies (MUSE) course in one of the museum professional specialties: Leadership and Management, Interpretation, Collections, and Community Connections. For each specialty, courses incorporate training in best practices, policy development, legal and regulatory concerns, as well as future trends.

  • Leadership and Management addresses avenues for building resilient institutions through administration, planning, collaboration and fund raising, as well as the legal issues related to the management of contemporary non-profit organizations.
    MUSE 701 Museum Management
    Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museums as organizations; accounting, budget cycles, personnel management, and related topics will be presented using, as appropriate, case studies and a simulated museum organization model. (Same as AMS 731, BIOL 785, GEOL 783, and HIST 728.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.
    Fall 2017
    Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
    LEC Keckeisen, Robert
    R 05:30-08:00 PM BA 110 - LAWRENCE
    3 12763
  • Interpretation considers the processes and practices of making meaning through exhibition design and installation, graphics, marketing, public programs, and innovative approaches to the use of new and emerging technologies.
    MUSE 703 Introduction to Museum Exhibits
    Presentation of principles and practices of exhibit management, design, and production. Topics will include developing a master plan for museum exhibits; concept development; design, installation, and maintenance of exhibits; design theory; design process; label writing and editing; selection of materials architectural requirements and building codes; cost estimating; publicity; security; and exhibit evaluation. Consideration will be given to exhibition problems in public and private museums in the areas of anthropology, art, history, natural history, and technology. (Same as AMS 700, BIOL 787, GEOL 781, and HIST 723.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

    The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


    MUSE 705 Introduction to Museum Public Education
    Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as AMS 797, BIOL 784, GEOL 784, and HIST 721.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.
    Fall 2017
    Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
    LEC Madden, Mary
    T 05:30-08:00 PM WES 4037 - LAWRENCE
    3 16236
  • Collections focuses on expertise in the practices and policies associated with the management and care of the wide range of objects and materials in museum collections.
    MUSE 704 Principles and Practices of Museum Collection Management
    Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, BIOL 798, GEOL 785, and HIST 725.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

    The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


    MUSE 706 Conservation Principles and Practices
    This course will acquaint the future museum professional with problems in conserving all types of collections. Philosophical and ethical approaches will be discussed, as well as the changing practices regarding conservation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on detection and identification of causes of deterioration in objects made of organic and inorganic materials, and how these problems can be remedied. Storage and care of objects will also be considered. (Same as AMS 714, BIOL 700, GEOL 780, and HIST 722.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.

    The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


    MUSE 707 Practical Archival Principles
    Study of the principles and practices applicable to the preservation, care, and administration of archives and manuscripts. Practical experience will be an integral part of this course. (Same as HIST 727.) LEC.

    The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.


    MUSE 710 Current Trends in Curation and Collection Management
    Seminar course to provide students with a working knowledge of the primary issues and current trends in building, administration, and care of scientific collections. Topics include permits, collecting, accessioning, cataloging, preservation, preventive conservation, and access to collections and data. The course format consists of readings, lectures, guest speakers, discussions, and visits to scientific collections on campus. (Same as BIOL 706.) LEC.

    The class is not offered for the Fall 2017 semester.

  • Community Connections encompasses the ways museums can engage and collaborate with different publics through programming, curriculum planning, visitor studies, and audience development.
    MUSE 705 Introduction to Museum Public Education
    Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as AMS 797, BIOL 784, GEOL 784, and HIST 721.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC.
    Fall 2017
    Type Time/Place and Instructor Credit Hours Class #
    LEC Madden, Mary
    T 05:30-08:00 PM WES 4037 - LAWRENCE
    3 16236

Museum Conceptual Domains (6 credits)

The conceptual domains of museum work, Materiality, Engagement, and Representation, address in depth the conceptual and theoretical foundations of museums. Courses that emphasize conceptual domains will place museological subjects in broader historical and intellectual frameworks. Students may take courses focused on one or more of these areas, and which may be offered in one or several disciplines. Courses will be selected with the approval of Director of Museum Studies, as well as the course instructor. Approval will be based on the general relevance of the course, and assurance that the student’s work in the class will be applicable to museum studies.

Museum Experience (3 credit hours)

Students in the Museum Studies Graduate Certificate program are required to complete at least 250 hours in an approved, professionally supervised internship. The internship forms a critical component of the student’s total program and gives the student valuable training in the field as well as a chance to work closely with professional museum staff on meaningful projects in order to prepare for careers as museum professionals.

The internship must be mutually beneficial to both the student and the participating institution and be focused on activities relevant to the student's interests. The primary goal is to offer high-quality educational and practical experience in which the student acquires in-depth understanding of museum operations and activities while making a substantial professional contribution to the institution. Students should discuss possible internships with their advisors and the Museum Studies Director. Students may apply for internships at local, regional, national, or international museums. Internships may be paid or unpaid.

Work done prior to enrolling in the Museum Studies Program cannot be credited toward the museum experience requirement.

Internship Requirements

  1. Students must complete an internship with a minimum of 250 contact hours in an approved institution.
  2. A student intern must enroll for 3 credit hours in MUSE 799, AMS 799, BIOL 799, GEOL 723, or HIST 799 (enrollment may be divided over more than one term).
  3. Internships usually take place during the summer between the student’s first and second year in the Museum Studies Program. They may also take place during the school year. Students should make every effort to work at their internship at least half-time.
  4. Documentation.
    a.   Internship Approval Form. Prior to the internship, the student must submit a description of the duties and activities that the internship will entail, including the name of the museum professional who will serve as the on-site supervisor. The Museum Studies Director must approve and sign the form before the internship begins. Documentation that the student has been accepted by the host institution must be provided.
    b.   Journal and Portfolio. The student must keep a personal journal that describes, and reflects on, the internship experience. There is no predefined format for the journal; it may be hand written or kept electronically – the critical element is that it is kept regularly. The portfolio will contain materials associated with the internship experience, such as products for which the student was responsible, photographs of activities, institutional policies and procedures, and examples of materials produced by the institution.
    c.   Evaluation. At the end of the internship, the student’s on-site supervisor will submit to the Museum Studies Director a confidential evaluation of the student’s performance.
    d.   Paper. Students are required to write a paper describing, evaluating, and critically analyzing their internship experience. The student will use the paper to discuss how the internship supported their professional development as well as how they feel that they contributed to the institution’s goals.
  5. Internships receive a grade of “S” (Satisfactory) or “U” (Unsatisfactory). The Museum Studies Director will assign a final grade based on the student’s paper, journal, and portfolio, along with the on-site supervisor’s evaluation.

Museum Events

Pursuing Elusive Equity in Higher Education
Talk by Professor Jennifer Hamer
​Tuesday, March 28 | 7:30 p.m.
The Commons, Spooner Hall
1450 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence, KS

Building KU CommUnity Potluck
Thursday March 30 | 4 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Ecumenical Campus Ministries
1204 Oread Lawrence, KS
RSVP via FaceBook

Brent Learned, Artist Event
Friday, March 31 | 5 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Phoenix Gallery
825 massachusetts St., Lawrence, KS
Information about the artist and gallery

Art of Conversation: Social Service/Social Justice
Friday, March 31 | 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Watkins Museum of History
1047 Massachusetts St., Lawrence, KS
Further information

Talk: Up Close: American Dream
Sunday, April 2 | 2 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Spencer Museum of Art
1301 Mississippi St., Lawrence, KS
On KU Campus
Event description

Film: Out in the Night
Thursday, April 6 | 5:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Spencer Museum of Art Auditorium
1301 Mississippi St., Lawrence, KS
On KU Campus
Further information on the film

Public Film Screening
Francofonia by Alexander Sokurov
Cinemuse: Selfie with Sokurov by Dragan Kujundzic
Friday April 7 | 6 p.m.
Kansas Union, Centennial Room

Grant Develpment as a Professional Skill Workshop
Wednesday April 19 | 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Hall Center for the Humanities 
Seminar Room 1
900 Sunnyside Ave.
RSVP to hgdo@ku.edu or call 785.864.7833
by April 12

First National African American Quilt Convention
July 12-15, 2017
TBD, Lawrence, Kansas
http://www.naaqc.org/

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